Podcast Random Fit

Random Fit: Getting More from Your Core Workouts

National Academy of Sports Medicine
National Academy of Sports Medicine
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It seems most people have a different interpretation about what core workouts are and how they are designed to be executed.
In this episode, hosts Wendy Batts and Ken Miller detail several different tips to help strengthen the spine and core.
 
Sit up as “Random Fit” helps you feel the crunch - so you can look and feel your best, all the way to the core!
 
 

 

 
TRANSCRIPT:
 
Wendy Batts:
Hello, everybody, welcome to another episode of "Random Fit." I am Wendy Batts and I am here with my friend, colleague and regional master instructor, Mr. Ken Miller, how are you today?

Ken Miller:
I'm good. And in that order, right? So call Yeah, I'll take it. But how are you doing, Wendy?

Wendy Batts:
I am living the dream. So all is well and super excited about our topic. As always. Today, we are going to talk about getting more from your core. So um, you know, I know personally in the gym, I get asked a lot about, you know, how do I train my core? Or I hear Oh, I did you know that Britney Spears workout at 500 crunches every single day, and my low back hurts. So can you kind of talk me through why that would happen when your core is supposed to be super strong and prevent that. And so I think today, we can probably go through some hopefully helpful tips and things to consider when you're in the gym doing your own workouts. So therefore, you can actually get more from your core.

Ken Miller:
Exactly. And I think it was it was a workshop that I was teaching with with Tony Ambler-Wright. And one of the questions that he asked the group is, alright, who can show me a core exercise, right? And inevitably, somebody would do a plank, and then somebody would do a sit up, and then somebody would do like a bicycle crunch? And then, and then he would and I think it was Tony, but he would have them kind of lay out on the ground. Alright, show me, you know, everybody Show me what you what you just mentioned. And it's funny because everybody's doing core, but everybody has a different interpretation of what core is or how it should be executed. I mean, here's the thing. Everybody was right. Right. So if you're doing a plank, if you're doing, you know, crunches, sit ups, extensions, things like that, you are right you are you're activating those spinal muscles, it's just, you're doing it in a different way. And as I talked to more athletes over time, or people over time who want to get in shape, or like what you mentioned, when they, they have some kind of low back issue, or some kind of issue with their spine? Well, here's the thing, what you're doing, at some level, in some scenario, is a great exercise, right? For the most part, if they're executing properly, but you know, you can't do the same thing over and over and over again, then, you know, you start to do you know, overuse, you know, overuse injury start to happen. So that's what I'm really excited about when we talk about getting more for your core.

Wendy Batts:
And I think it's important to really think about and actually discuss what the core is, because we automatically assume that the core is just your abs. And we hear that and I asked my clients, I want to work my core, I'm like, fantastic, what is your core, and the look on their faces is kind of like, Hello, my abs. And I'm like, Well, actually, you know, if we were to remove your arms and legs, everything else that's remaining is technically your core. And so basically all the muscles that protect your spine, and in actually move your spine that is part of your core. And so I think it's important to really highlight that first and foremost, because when people keep saying, I'm working my core, I'm working my core, well, you're working your abs. However, if you really take two steps back and think about how do I get those little muscles that protect the spine to fire first, before I start moving it like constantly with either a ton of weight, or a ton of movement, or even explosive movements that could injure me long term. And, you know, there is a there is a progression that you want to actually think about and make sure that you're actually ready for some of those more dynamic type movements. You know, so therefore, you don't have pain, you know, that you're actually training it the right way.

Ken Miller:
Right. Right. And one of the and, you know, one of the things that we, you know, we you and I talk about to our clients, I'm sure, especially our higher level functioning clients is that a lot of times they've been exposed to the that, as you mentioned, that dynamic, actually is something where they're throwing a med ball, or they're doing a hip twist, right, you know, when they, when they touch the med ball they're holding, and they sit and turn and touch the ball to the floor. And they do the same thing on the other side. You see that all the time. But meanwhile, their spines all you know, wonky and arching their back and they're all over the place, and they're filling in the ABS during that workout. But then later that night, you know, they got a little bit of tightness. So all those muscles that you're talking about, especially those that run up and down closer to the spine, we you know, because we're talking about different muscle fiber types, right, different insertions and how long or how far they run up and down the spine that's going to affect how they function. And you know, it's it's gaining control of that first and that's one of the things that I tell my clients is that, you know, it's not that we're taken away. sit ups from you. It says we need to put it at bay for now, let's let's kind of set it aside for now let's get these other things firing first so that when we do our set up, whether it's a crunch or sit up, you're doing it with the most efficiency possible, or I'll just say it like this with the less amount, the least amount of stress on the joints as possible. Once we get this other stuff cleared up.

Wendy Batts:
Well, and you know, I've always said this, and I know this is a beginning of something. So it's not like something I came up with, but you're really truly only as strong as you are stable. And so those little muscles that protect the spine, there's approximately 29 muscles that make up the core. And that you know, and so if you think about it that way, if you can get all of those 29 muscles to fire optimally, and all at the same time, and then start adding other bigger muscle groups to that you're going to actually be able to lift more, you're going to move more, and you're going to get more out of your workout. And so one of the questions I always get was, you know, like, Why are you always having me do bridges or planks or side planks? Or, you know, you know, quote, you know, a cobra on the floor, like, why do you have me do this. And it's mainly because I'm trying to correct muscle imbalances. But I am trying to get those little muscles to fire by drawing in or bracing, squeezing the glutes, keeping my hips neutral. Because again, if you get those little muscles to fire, I just said how much more beneficial, it's going to be long term. But nobody really likes to do it. Because you can't see it. They want to go into the crunches, they want to go into the back extensions and rotations because it's training the sexy muscles that you need when you're in a bathing suit, or you're going to the beach and all this stuff. And it's like, well, why would I train the little muscles when you can only see the big ones. When in all reality, you need to kind of reverse that mindset of thinking, if you get the little ones to fire when you do try to train the big muscles that you can see, you're going to actually have better results.

Ken Miller:
Right? And what I liked about what you just said there, Wendy, was in as far as the exercises that you listed off you you listed off planks, bridges, side planks. And the thing about that selection of exercises is that you're challenging the trunk, both from the back. So if you're supine, say we're challenging, from front to back, if I'm on my back, and then when you're faced down or prone, you're you're you're encountering resistance from the front, right. So gravity is trying to suck you down to the floor, right. So you're trying to keep the spine stable against this force that's pulling you forward. And then from the side, of course, now we're working on stability, with force coming from the right side and the left side. So I like that that battery of exercises that you list because it also shows that we need to encounter or be able to resist movement or produce movement as well eventually, in all directions. So front to back, back to front and side to side. And that comes with how we challenge the body. So we are looking at not just moving slow, controlling spine, but also giving it an opportunity to have different different forces from different directions in order to keep it nice and safe.

Wendy Batts:
Yes. Now if you're just joining us, my name is Wendy Batts. And I'm here with Ken Miller. We're talking today about getting more out of your core. And can I absolutely agree and it you know, one thing too, and I think this is a common misconception is that when you first have someone do a plank, you know, I know as a trainer, and especially being kind of under the NSM umbrella, you know, we do things for repetitions, and we do things at a very slow pace. And what we're trying to do is really execute more of the essential component or when you're kind of decelerating, if you if you will, because that's where most injuries occur when you're turning and going down into a movement. And so we want to make sure that we're trying to, you know, optimize activation there. So with that being said, though, you know, people will say, Oh, I can do a plank, and I can hold it for 60 seconds. And I'm like, Okay, you've been sitting on a couch. And now you can hold a plank for 60 seconds, and you didn't really work your way up to that. And then I just have them show me and we do this all the time in the workshop. And it's like, you know, what, if you get someone in the five kinetic chain checkpoints, and if you're just now you know, joining us and you're not sure what those are, your feet are pointed straight ahead, they're about shoulder and hip with the part your abs are in, you're squeezing your glutes. So good neutral position of the spine, shoulders back and your heads back and then I put you face down so you're in that exact same position standing and then I put you in that position while your face down onto your forearms. And and I have you really draw in and squeeze your glutes so I can tell looking down at you because it looks like you're eating your shorts or giving yourself your own self wedgie. If you can hold that three to five seconds and then come all the way to the ground and relax and then repeat and then relax and then repeat. It is a lot harder to do because you're having to contract relax, contract Relax at a very slow controlled pace, versus going ahead and propping up onto your arms, not really focusing on drawing in or squeezing your glutes. And you know, seeing how long you can stand that. I mean, you'll feel it in your abs. But are you really targeting the inner deep muscles that you're trying to target? And the answer may be, yes, you absolutely may be doing it perfect. And but I know, with my clients, we start three to five seconds and then work our way up to a longer duration of time in order to maximize what we're trying to accomplish each and every rep that they do.

Ken Miller:
Right. And the funny thing is, maybe not that funny. But when you have somebody that says that, like I can hold the plank for a minute, two minutes, I think the longest somebody told me that they can hold a plank was six minutes, right? Just the average person coming off the street that this is what the person says to me. Alright, well show me how like, like what you just said, What? Show me how you do that. Show me what that looks like. And then the second, I asked him to do what you just asked when he was, you know, squeeze your glutes or kind of eat your shorts was, you know, you just have this little flickering of activity, right? You see, you see their glutes trying to squeeze trying, trying to get that contraction. And then you see a little fluttering like that, you know, a light bulb that's not screwed in all the way. That's the way that's the way boots look when that when they're trying to squeeze it. Like that's the hardest thing I've ever done.
 
Wendy Batts:
All right, well, and I yeah, I get that too. And that's why I think a lot of times the plank is so underutilized. But because people are doing it incorrect. So they're like, Oh, that's easy, I want to go into something that's a little harder for me to do. And I'm like, Well, really, how easy is it, let's just try it my way. Try for reps and all, I want you to do three to five seconds, and then you're going to drop down. And so what's happening is you have to use your shoulder stabilizers to bring yourself up and down, you're having to draw an equation for that. So again, all of those muscles that protect the spine are firing, your glutes are firing. And you know, so it is a really good workout. When you do that. However, a common compensation I see, because of the same thing, it's hard. So they're going to use any muscle that they can, they can to try to get those glutes to look like they're really squeezing. And they bring their heels together. And instead of like keeping them shoulder to hip with the part just like a seven year standing up, that shoulder to hip with the part should stay the same way even when your face down. Because if your heels come together, you're cheating by using one of your inner thigh muscles called your adductor magnus. It's just a big muscle that attaches to your pubic bone. And it's going to want to take over so you're really not firing your glutes, you're using this one muscle that's super overactive already in most people. And you're really not firing the right things to keep your spine in neutral. And so you know, really easy as a trainer to notice these things. But if you are new to working out, and you're listening to us, and you want some ideas, try to do a plank, three to five seconds, try to keep everything lined up, focus on squeezing your glutes without using your heels and see what you think. Just give yourself that is that's one of the things I'm going to say, dude, do this and see how you feel. And then you can send me an email and say, Piece of cake or Wow, hello core, better yet posted on social media and go ahead and tag us and go from there.
 
Ken Miller:
But yeah, I mean, you take that same idea, again, you mentioned, you know, plank bridges and side planks. And you take that same idea to the other to the other component, you know, even to the side plank, where someone's usually gonna, they're gonna dip their hip, or they're gonna flex at the hip, so their butt is pointing back in a way, or their heads out of position. So all these all these other things, you know, like what we're talking about, you know, you're bringing up the heels, but you can you can show weakness in the trunk, or that the court needs a lot more help by watching the shoulder blades or the shoulder blades kind of flying all over the place of poking up and away from the rib cage. Or do you are you arching your back again, this, these are the small muscles of the spine, asking for help. And that's just because the demand that you're putting out is just too you know, it's just too much they're not strong enough. And that's where that exercise you bring up when need just the plank from a three to five second hold and then lower your your body back to the floor. I had one of my golfers say that was one of the hardest things that they've ever had to do for their, their trunk. Right? It's just one of the hardest things, especially when I kept picking on their shoulders and their shoulder blades. Right. It's one thing for them to squeeze the glutes, but then now I bring up that second part is as far as looking at how their upper bodies you know, you know, playing a role in that exercise. They're like, dude, now you want me to, you know, push my ribs up against my shoulder blades. I'm like, Well, I mean, when you golf, it's just not your glutes. Right, right, your shoulder blade, so move on. You're right so it's all together so everything has to be strong and coordinated at the same time.

Wendy Batts:
And I think it's important to to think about the neck, because remember, I just said arms and legs if they're not there. So your cervical spine is super important as well. So if you let your head drop down, like you're kind of looking at your feet, or what I usually see is people are putting their hands together, like they're praying, and they look up. And I'm like, you know, I, there's nothing to see there, look at the ground, keep your chin retracted, keep your spine in a good position. And you know, if you want to look up, look up, when was the the set is completed, and then you can look at whatever you want. However, during this exercise, you have to be very, very specific, like you said, with your positioning and trying to maintain that. But you know, so when we're talking about this, we kind of term it as more of like, the stabilizers were those little muscles that stabilize the spine. And so basically any exercise that has little to no joint motion of the spine, or exercises, you want to consider doing first and build your way up to either longer durations or, you know, even doing a bridge like love the bridge, one of my favorites. And the bridge is where you're laying on your back, your your knees are bent, like they're going to be like you're going to do a crunch. However, instead of moving your upper body, it's just lifting your hips straight off the ground up towards the ceiling, and then bringing them back down. You know, you can load that you can put a weight on your hip, you can put a bar on your hip, you can do anything that you want, as long as you've earned that right to increase the amount of load that you're lifting. And so just starting with your own bodyweight is hard for people because their knees are flare out, their knees will come in, you know, they're not keeping their spine in a good position. So, you know, start with those exercises first, and then progress. And so you know, can, this whole progression is where people start. That's what that's why I have low back pain is okay, let's start easy. So do you want to talk a little bit about the whole movement situation?

Ken Miller:
Well, yeah, and, and to put, and to put, you know, flexing and you know, crunches and all that stuff before everything else is, is really putting the cart before the horse because here we are, we're trying to get the spine to move, like you said, when the earlier it's, it's not about the muscles that you can see. Right, the outer muscle is the muscles that are deep that we need to focus on first. Now, once you get that, I mean, again, like I told clients, we're not trying to take things away from you, we're just gonna kind of put it aside, you know, it's like trying to eat dessert first, like now, you can have dessert, just eat it after your veggies in the main dish. You know, you're so fun. Like who does that? Well. You've been talking to my kids. I've been talking to my kid. So you're listening to me, Ken Miller and my friend and colleague Wendy Batts here on random fit, talking about getting more from your core. And in this progression here, you know, once again, you can control the spine, hold it nice still and steady, and have full control of it and watch out for you know, arching and all these other compensations that were you may have mentioned before, but now we're talking about strengthening up now we can flex. Now we can go ahead and do the setups now we can do the crunches. And now we can get flexing. And now we can do exercises like extend. So if we flex, we must extend. And you know, one of the things I do want to touch on is the fact that you know a lot of people flex, right, but not a whole lot of people extend. So if you're going to move the spine, now if we're going to go side to side, we're going to rotate, we're going to flex, we are going to extend, there is a bias with a lot of a lot of us, even myself you to go into flexion. So what I mean by that is we're bringing our ribs down towards our hips, or even our hips towards our ribs. But a lot of times, we are shortening the front side of the abdominal complex. So if you're going to go one way, go the other way, just as much. But now that we're talking about strength, now we can move, as long as we can control the trunk, we can control the hip complex, but now it's now the relationship of the vertebrae, one relative to the other. Now, now that we know that the vertebrae have a better relationship, they are stronger, they are more stable. Now we have a lot more liberty, as far as moving forward, backward, flexing, extending, and rotating. And all the things that come along with what this minor is supposed to do.

Wendy Batts:
Right. And I think that is, to me one of the most important things to highlight. Because if you start doing the flexion and extension and the rotation, and you really haven't trained those small muscles that protect the spine, guys think of it you know, a doughnut, and if I were to, you know, if you think about your vertebrae, and you've got a jelly doughnut in the middle of just like your disk, right, and you don't have those muscles that keep the spine in total alignment. Then just like if I had the jelly doughnut here and one side started to get really tight and overactive, it's going to start to shorten those vertebrae meaning bring them together and then think about pushing on it. jelly doughnut, if you do on one side, what eventually happens is that jelly will start shooting out the back end. Well, that's the same thing, when you're thinking about the discs of your back, if you don't maintain proper alignment and get good positioning of those muscles to keep the vertebrae where they're supposed to be, then there causes some compression on that disc that leads to pain, irritation, bulging discs, ruptured discs. And we're hearing unfortunately, more and more of that. And so if you think you know, if you notice that somebody has a bulging disc, then they're probably really weak in their core. And so you want to be able to loosen up that muscle to lay off of that jelly doughnut to get it back just kind of sitting right, right, kind of like the sandwich, you got the vertebrae, jelly donut vertebrae, you want to keep it just like that. Because as soon as one of them compresses, there's going to be an issue. And so I think if you know that that is dialed, and then now you start doing your crunches, and you don't do them to where it's so repetitive, like 500 crunches, there's no need for that, there really isn't a need for that. And when people are complaining, oh, I do 500 crunches a day like you said, they're already usually in a flexed position. Now you're going into like repetitive flexion flexion flexion flexion, you know, there's something called your so as your so as as a hip flexor, but it attaches to every one of your lumbar spine. And so it's going to keep pulling your spine inward to give you a bigger arch. But then you're also constantly shortening a muscle that's already overactive and irritated. And that's what ends up leading to people long term to pain is their hips are super tight, their glutes are super weak, and now their lower back has an increase arch. That's not comfortable for anyone. And if you don't believe me, stand up, stick up, make you a huge arch in your back. Don't contract your glutes, and then just try to walk around like that. And you tell me how that feels. Because that is a no go for me does not feel good.
 
Ken Miller:
Trying to do it sitting here like that. But yeah, it does not feel good. But I think one of the things that we need to do is kind of step back a little bit and look beyond just the core as a, just a section of the body. And look at and kind of put some context to it. Because if we look at what the core actually does, right are one of the things that it's responsible for. If you think about the court corps being center, I mean, it is literally the center of the body. So when you walk when you throw when you're, when you're pressing anything overhead, all this force has to go through the center of the body, right, so when you jump in, you land, all that force from the landing actually transfers up through the lower extremity through the trunk through the midsection, and up to the lower body. So it is it is a it is a area of the body where a lot of forces coming from top to bottom and bottom to up. So we've got to be able to control that's fine. So you talking about, you know what's happening at the vertebrae to put it in context. It's not, we're not just incurring that stress, when we sit down too much, or when we do too many sit ups or crunches, it's when you put something on your back when you put that that strap on your back and you got your backpack on now you're loading the spine. And if you are in that position that you're talking about Wendy where your back is arched, you're so as as you know, a little overactive, your glutes are a little weak or your little weak and loosey goosey around the midsection, well, all that force is now going to be loaded vertically through that spine. And now as we take that right foot forward that left foot forward as we walk across the room. Now with 1015 pounds on our back, that's just more stress that's coming through the spine. So again, just another point or argument towards working on stability first, and then we can work on adding load and flexing and extending because just overall I mean, just big picture how this translates to, to real life is how are you able to load the spine safely? And not just from an exercise standpoint, but what does that translate into? From the day to day?

Wendy Batts:
Yes, and if you guys are just tuning in, I'm Wendy Batts here with Ken Miller, we're talking about getting more from your core. And can I think that's super super good point because unfortunately now even in the younger grades, there are so many textbooks and so many things that the little guys are having to carry or little girls to on their backs and their backpacks like but their lunches and their water bottles and their books and their computers even whatever it may be. That's a lot to withstand. So you know, even we're starting to see more and more injuries occur and more discomfort and you know, I'm just starting at a younger age and I think it's because they're sitting down more technology, obviously, especially last year was you know, a killer for a lot of people because it decreased activity and they weren't doing some of the things that kept them stronger before. So it's also you know, as a parent, as a trainer and then just as you know, you know, just in general I think it's important that no matter what, what age your, your your kids are or whatever, whatever age you are, it's important because you don't need equipment for any of this stuff. This is all stuff that You can do at home, it's all stuff that's going to help you long term. And so, you know, just to highlight that, train your core as much as you can, but just be really smart about it and slow things down, activate things.

Ken Miller:
Yeah, I don't know. Yeah, very good. And that's, that's one of my mottos is, like you do a lot of things just do a lot of different things. Because if you keep doing the same thing over and over and over again, those overuse patterns, it's kind of like, you know, the wear pattern of, of your of your tires, right? You keep making right turns, right, you're gonna wear out that tire unevenly. And the same thing, if you keep doing a bunch of setups, you're gonna wear out that trunk or the smile, or even though overuse those muscles, you know, bias towards one way or direction. So, again, you know, do all the things do those do PNF patterns, you know, chops, cable chops. But if I'm going to do a chop, I'm gonna do a lift, right. So if I'm going to go down and diagonal, I want to go up and diagonal, if I'm going to flex, I want to extend, so move a lot, right? Move plenty through, especially through the trunk. I mean, we know, I mean, you know, when he that a lot of people are walking around, they, they don't have good trunk strength. And even before that, they don't have good trunk stability. But then now as we can do that now, we have earned the right as you said earlier, as you earn the right to now pro things and now to use implements an external load and throwing med balls and things like that all the cool stuff that you see on social media, right, that people are all sweaty, and they're having a lot of fun. And now they're throwing these 10 pound med balls, you know, you know, on the beach, wherever they are, right. So that last part A lot of times is the sexy exercise a lot of people want to get to or like to do, but, you know, you have two things that have to proceed that first right? strength before stability. Right? No, sorry, stability before a race the last 20 minutes, right. He wants to really report strength, but we need strength before power.

Wendy Batts:
Yes. And I think one other important part, or one important point I'd like to highlight before because I know I could talk for all day, and I don't want to run out of time. But um, if you've got, you know, a belly and you know, your your belly is hanging over your pants, and you're really unhappy about it. And doing all of these crunches is not going to make that go away. Unfortunately, you can't spot reduce, unfortunately, you cannot make no matter how many exercises you do for that particular area that you think if I do this, it's going to make it disappear, that is not going to happen. If so we could spot reduce, and everyone would have the body that they've always wanted, because they're working on areas that they don't like. And unfortunately, your body is going to start to you know, lose body body fat, and start to become leaner as an entire unit. And some people's genetics will kind of dictate what ends up becoming leaner sooner than others. And and so you know, if you have like this unwanted fat, and I hate to say that, but that's what it is around your midsection, then really look at your diet, look at your diet, look at your your calorie intake, look at how much or you know how many calories you're burning throughout the day. See if there's a deficit deficit, if there's not maybe consider you know, kind of working with a registered dietician, or you know, I am certified nutrition coach, somebody that you can discuss nutrition with, because nutrition really does play a role, and how lean you are, you know, working on specific areas are going to make you stronger and more powerful. However, just be very smart and think that it is really all inclusive, you can't have one without the other. So you want to look at your program as one complete thing. And then work on it individually as you go.

Ken Miller:
Yep, and with as it is with food intake and nutrition, it takes time, you're not going to you know, cut this in this in this out and expect to have good results or visible results within the first couple of weeks. Right. And the same thing goes for, you know, getting that core strength. You know, one of the things that I know you and I teach, you know, four to six weeks on stability, four to six weeks with strength, and then we can get into power after that. So just by progressions alone, according to what research supports as far as getting the adaptation, getting stability, right, getting strength, it takes time and nutrition is the same thing. I mean, you're going to first of all, you have to figure out what you're going to eat, what not to eat, how to eat it, right. And then looking at your timing and then all of the all the stuff that goes into body composition change, but got to give that time and, I mean, if someone has a as a vacation to Cancun, with you know, in the next few weeks, you know, hey, just love yourself for who you are. You're going to look the way you Look, you know, all you're gonna do is get hungry, before you're angry, you're gonna get hangry. Man, you know, you might lose an inch within those three weeks. But, you know, come on, you know, your, your trip to Cancun should have been planned out, you know, exercise and nutrition wise, back in December or January, right? Yeah, just along with everybody else.

Wendy Batts:
So I always say you may have a six pack underneath it, however, in order to see it, you got to shed it. So you know, that's my parting words is, you know, think of an all inclusive, you know, program for yourself, when you're working the core, you know, really think about working inside out. And it's more than what the muscles look like, it should be how everything is functioning together as a unit, protect, you know, be good to your body, be good to your body, because you're going to feel better, and then you're going to look better, you're going to move better, perform better. And if you've got pain and discomfort, it's not fun. And then you're you know, maybe going to have to take some kind of anti inflammatory from a doctor or shot or something that could have been completely avoided, if you had just taken time to make the right progressions in your exercise selection, especially when you're trying to focus on the core.

Ken Miller:
Right. And for those of you that are, that are starting a workout program, connect with a certified personal trainer, who's, obviously we are going to endorse those that are certified with the National Academy of sports medicine that can take a look at your body and they can identify deficits on where you lack flexibility, you lack strength, and especially, especially with this topic of looking at, okay, where do you need to start as far as your stability goes, where your flexibility needs to be first before we start challenging the spine, especially where you want to take it for your you know, for your goals and your objectives. So great stuff, Wendy. Super fun. I love it for fun. I love talking about the core, but or just exercise in general, but core is a big topic these days. So thank you all for listening to random fit and getting more for your car. It's me Ken Miller with Wendy Batts. We so very much appreciate you listening to us. And if you liked what you listened to today and want to listen to more from us in the future, like follow comment and subscribe. And until next time, take care and be well.
 

 

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National Academy of Sports Medicine

National Academy of Sports Medicine

Since 1987 the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) has been the global leader in delivering evidence-based certifications and advanced specializations to health and fitness professionals. Our products and services are scientifically and clinically proven. They are revered and utilized by leading brands and programs around the world and have launched thousands of successful careers.