Podcast Random Fit

Random Fit: Plyometrics for everyone

National Academy of Sports Medicine
National Academy of Sports Medicine
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The idea of explosive movements in workouts has historically been reserved for athletes, high-intensity programs, or group exercise sessions. 
 
What if we told you there’s some form of "power" or "plyometric" for everyone? 
In this episode of “Random Fit,” NASM Master Instructors Wendy Batts and Ken Miller outline all the ins and outs of explosive movements that can help you take your workouts to the next level.
 

 

 

 
TRANSCRIPT:
 
Wendy Batts:
Hello, everybody, welcome to "Random Fit." My name is Wendy Batts and I am here with my friend, colleague and master instructor, regional master instructor, Ken Miller. How are you today?
 
Ken Miller:
I'm great, Wendy, how you doing? Good. Fantastic. You as well, you as well, fun, fun, fun part of my week. I love doing these.
 
Wendy Batts:
So, and today we have a very fun topic we're talking about I got the power. So we're going to actually talk about power training.

Ken Miller:
Yeah, I say, you know, and the thing I love about this is that it's got a lot of applications in. And a lot of people don't realize that. So when you have you know, your your gym goer, who's who's using the cardio who's using the selectorized equipment, you know, you're seated chest press, seated rows, or even, you know, the the free weights and the dumbbells. Very rarely do you see anybody having to move fast and to jump right unless they're with a personal trainer, right. And that's personal trainer can kind of be seen sometimes as being sadistic, or just wanting you to sweat faster than if you were to workout on your own. But moving fast is something that is really important, from a day to day standpoint. And especially as we go through the aging process, we have to be able to move quickly and control speed.
 
Wendy Batts:
And I think, you know, for us to talk about this is to tap into a component of a workout that sometimes just non existent. So I think we will go ahead and dive into it and look at the value of it all, as well as how do you implement power plyometrics into the everyday workout?
 
Ken Miller:
Yes, I know, we've talked about this before. But remember, you're only as strong as you are stable, you're only as powerful as you are strong and stable. So there is something to be said about making sure when your workouts that you obviously do a progression, and that you just don't wake up one day and say you know what, I'm going to go do a power workout, I just want to go throw a bunch of stuff, you know, against a wall with like med balls and stuff, or I'm going to lift as heavy as I can. However, there is something to be said about lifting heavy moving faster. And like you said, I think one way that I try to describe this for my clients is you need to train for the speed of life. But you also want to train under control. So just because you can doesn't mean you should. At that moment, however, we want to be able to get people to react fast and move quicker. And you know, and and especially if you're working with professional athletes, having power is going to be super important because that is, you know, basically their career what they need, and we want to keep them healthy. But you know, taking a bunch of steps back and working your way up, you know, like appropriately really does account for so much Plus, it does end up making them run faster, move quicker and become more powerful. And everything that they're doing when they have a good foundation of stabilization, strength, and then the power. Right. And one of the one of the things that I that kind of sticks out in my mind, is when I first started off in fitness, and I was working out at I was working in San Diego at a at a health club. And I remember a one of those sit and be fit silver sneaker, you know, balance or fall prevention programs. And I think about that, and that's almost 30 years ago now, to where you know, what did they do, they had chairs in front of them, they were supported, or they were sitting down and they were lifting but now when you think about the application of power, especially with our with our older clients, they need to move fast, right? And I'm bringing this up because when when does power, when should power training start right? for the for the purpose of fall prevention, it needs to start when we're young, right. And when we're younger, it comes in the form of play, playing Chase and tag and dodgeball and all of those other things, we have to move quickly. But you know, being a sedentary society as we are here, you know, you're sitting behind the computer, we lose all of that, and then we lose our ability to recruit the nervous system quickly. And then unfortunately has a an end effect to where, you know, as we get older, we lose the ability to move fast and when you lose the ability to react and move quickly. And as you said when they move at the speed of life, right? That's where things can can get a little hairy for us as we as we get older because it's one thing to know that you're falling and that's where balance comes into play. But do you have the power and the speed to be able to lift that leg and place it where you need it to be placed for you to not fall? So I approached this

Wendy Batts:
This component of power training or plyometric, and reactive work, you know, all the terminologies that come into, you know, how we teach, you know, speed training, you know more as a more as a necessity for life, especially as we as we get older, it's not just the nice to do thing and get sweaty, and you know, do what's sexy in the gym, but it is about overall, in the end, can we move fast to preserve ourselves from, you know, prevent falling. And to your point can, there's so many different definitions of power. And so when you're increasing velocity, and you're increasing force, and obviously, you're going to increase power. And if you increase one of those, it is going to actually, you know, turn over and increase both. And so or increase your power anyway. So to your point, you know, there's plyometrics, or the reactive, which is more of repetitive movements, and like you said, the fancy footwork, and then you've got the power when you're looking at your Olympic lifts. And you're looking at, you know, doing that, and then immediately doing a superset or something that's going to increase your power by mimicking those same movement patterns. And so like, if we're really focusing more on the plyometric, so for example, a squat jump, it's really important to know how to land. And so I know with my clients, I know what the NASM, you know, methodology and philosophies that we teach, if you don't really land on the reactive, or the reactive portion of your foot or the right place of your foot, you are actually increasing the, you know, all the jargon that's going on in your back, like, how many times have you jumped off something and you feel that Stinger, that finger is not a good thing. And so, I mean, I think really focusing and understanding landing mechanics is going to help people, but it's something we take for granted, because we just jump in, then we don't even think about it. However, if you're landing on the reactive portion of your foot, and you're jumping in, you're maximizing the amount of force that you're able to, you know, to accept and then produce, and you're going to be able to jump higher, move faster, and it's better for your spine long term.
 
Ken Miller:
Right. And a lot of people don't understand that when it comes. I mean, we're talking, you know, we can't talk about power and the need for power. And I kind of alluded to it a little earlier with fall prevention. But when it when it comes to injury, a lot of people don't realize that when it comes to ACL tears or ACL injuries, a lot of that is the inability to what you're talking about Wendy is the inability to decelerate or to put on the brakes. You know, a lot of this society is about having a big engine. But a lot of us lose focus on the Federer or I've never been taught the value of having good breaks. And the analogy I bring up in workshops, is that, okay? if you're if you're going to convert your Volkswagen bug, no offense to Volkswagen bugs, and if you're going to put on a put in there if Ferrari engine and Ferrari brakes, what do you put on first? Well, putting the brakes first, because it doesn't do any good to have that big powerful engine, if you can't stop the car.
 
Wendy Batts:
Right. And that's where injuries come into play is that we have this inability to control and slow down and keep the joints in a good position as we are stopping because that's when we have the most force coming through the joint. And then when it comes to, again, that example of an ACL issue or an ACL injury, it's because we're rotating at the same time we're trying to stop and turn. And then that's when a lot of that stress is coming through that knee. So to have that ability to land and to teach and learn your clients learning how to control that landing is what's going to be the most important part of your training for plyometrics or reactive work, especially in the beginning of your sessions with power. Well, and what the ACL response. I mean, if you're, you know, most of us have seen, you know, sports on television, and unfortunately, you know, I'm going to use basketball as an example. You'll see someone, they'll do a breakaway, they go up, they do a simple layup and they land wrong. And they tear their ACL like that, to me is so like, you can avoid that if you're training appropriately and you're really focusing on power and landing and proper movement patterns. However, it's a little bit different. Like for example, if you've got a football player and you've got this huge lineman that comes and takes, you know, takes the knee out, that's something that was unpredicted. You know, like you couldn't control that that was a what they call contact injury versus a non contact meaning you did that on your own. And so you know, looking at to your point, you know, this landing and ways to keep yourself happy and avoid these types of injuries. It's, it's thinking about what we're talking about, and I know that I mentioned the reactive portion of the foot and if you are a visual person which I am if you think about your tennis shoe and you were to take your tennis shoe and bend it, you're going to notice that the normal bend of that shoe would be right what looks like about the ball all over the ball of your foot. However, the reactive portion of your foot is technically a little bit behind the ball of your foot, but in front of the arch, so it's a very small thin line of where you should ideally land in order to be able to absorb those types of forces and produce them the greater amount.
 
Ken Miller:
Plus, I mean, if you're working with professional athletes, what you're trying to do, especially like if they're, you know, they're basketball players, or they're actually going into the combines, it's important when they look at their vertical jump, right. So if you are a trainer, and you're working with professional athletes, or you're working with somebody that's going into, you know, college, or even if you're a player yourself and trying to better your vertical, learning how to land because the thing is, is if you can land and absorb the force, and then produce the amount of force that you need, you're going to jump higher, which is going to be a bigger contract, or possibly a scholarship. And so there is a lot to be said for that. So let me ask you this one, I'm really curious, you know, you're, you know, I know your background, and you've you've had strong background and working with athletes at high levels. So let me ask you this, then, if you're working with a guy who's been in the league for five plus years, and they can just dunk that ball at will in their sleep? How do you get a guy? How do you get a person that you're talking to? That? that, hey, you know, I have no, I have no problems jumping? Right? How do you kind of I don't want to say take them down a notch. But how do you say, Hey, listen,

Wendy Batts:
I'm looking at your squat, your knees are just all over the place, right? How do you get a guy who can just jump out of the out of the gym? To get them to understand, hey, before you, we work on getting you to jump even higher than that? Right? We need to get you to actually perform it this way. So how does that conversation go? Because I know what I say to my clients, but I'm really curious how you get somebody who's used to being up here, but you got to say, you know, let's let's start down here. You know what, unfortunately, because you know, I'm a female, and I'm not very tall when I get some of these, like seven footers that come in that can do this. And there's centers, and that's what they do is they don't stand and easily can just put their hand in the basket. And you know, it is kind of when they meet me, we have to have an understanding, like I'm trying to better your career, I'm trying to increase the longevity of your career by keeping you healthy. And so you know, for example, I always ask them like, okay, when you squat, and you're going to do a squat jump. So like, basically, I'm just going to have you almost like you're going to show me how you would touch the rim. And what what is it that you're trying to do. And they'll say, Oh, I go into a squat. And then I jumped straight up. And I do this. And so they show me an example. And so if I notice that their feet go out, their knees come in, and they're telling me that it should be this way. However, they're showing me something different than I'm like, Okay, that sounds great. Ideally, as we've talked about, you want to keep your feet straight, we want our knees to stay in line with our toes. So we're not putting excess pressure on the inside of your knee, which could lead to ACL issues, issues. And so that's what you're telling me, right? And they usually say yes. And so I'm like, perfect. And then I put them in front of a mirror. And I have them do the exact same thing. So I have them watch for themselves what they're doing. So therefore, I let them know, hey, do you see when you go down, your knees come in? And they'll say yes, I'm like you see it, your feet kind of come out? Well, if I squat it, and I'll demo like a really bad squat with my feet out my knees coming in? Do you see how this could lead to long term injuries if we don't fix this? And so they're like, Oh, yeah, I never knew that I did that. Because remember, our body is going to do the, the path of least resistance. So therefore, we want to make sure that you know what they think they're doing. And what they're actually doing are usually two different things. And so I think just making them aware and letting them know that you're there to support them and fix them, which is why they hired you in the first place. I think that's going to be super, super critical. Because we want to increase their power production, we want to decrease the chances of injury, we want to make sure that they're moving well to perform at a high level. So I don't know if you do anything different. But that's what I do.

Ken Miller:
That's the that's really good. Because I I'm always I'm always curious on how you handle these situations where you have somebody who's doing 10 times, you know what it is that you know, what most people can do, but then just kind of, I don't wanna say keep them in check, but just to kind of get them to where they need to back off. let's establish this first so that when you actually do this next time, you're you're going to be faster, you're going to jump higher in this example.
But the I mean, my situation is more working with high school a lot more. Unfortunately, working with junior high kids now because you know how
you know, some sports shut down, kids weren't staying active. And of course, sitting on their butts, their their hips got progressively weaker, they got de-conditioned. And then, and what you have is, or what I've seen is they tried to pick up where they left off. Well, you can't do that with a year hiatus off of activity no matter what the activity is. So what I usually see is actually worse, I'd say worse, but I see it more often to where they're at a lower level than what I'm used to getting. But to get them I mean, my, my vantage point is more along the lines of,
you're not doing plyometrics, you're not, you're not doing this now. So let's get started off on the right foot while you're still learning your body. While you're still learning about exercise, you're learning about how to not just get in shape for your sport. But as you get out of your teens and into your 20s and into your 30s These are some of the concepts that I want you to walk away with, especially regarding controlling your body under speed. And you know, the example you brought up with feet turning out your knees coming in, and maybe you got a little bit more of a lean forward. And if we can minimize or control that now nip that in the bud, then you know, you're gonna be in a much better position as you as you go forward, and not learning bad habits that you might otherwise pick up from your teammates from, say, a headset from your coach, or maybe the things your coach isn't teaching you. Right regarding plan, because I mean, if you think plyometrics and reactive work, what is it maybe fast speed drills, cone drill speed ladder drills, or some kind of pattern, where they don't learn how to control their, their foot ankle and their knee and their hips.
 
Wendy Batts:
Right. So this is where, you know, with a quick assessment, getting them to understand their body, how they're functioning today, how they need to function tomorrow, in order to function better 10 2030 years from now. And speed training is one of those things just never gets talked about. Unless it's regarding sport. But we know that everyday people needed just as much if not more than the athletes do. Yeah, I mean, so those of you that are just joining us, we're on random fit. And we're talking about getting the power, if you will. And I'm Wendy Batts I'm here with Ken Miller, and you know, I think can you bring up a really good and and very important part. And like we said, power should be for all ages. And so I know with you know, this isn't really the population that I train more of the elderly population or senior population, if you will, or active aging adult, and whatever way you want to call it, you know, if you have a speed ladder out, and you know, you have someone that go through the patterns, that is such a good thing, not only just for their body to move in different planes of motion, but also cognitively having to memorize patterns. You know, if you're working with people that, you know, have had some issues, you know, where now they're starting in the aging process to not pick up their feet. So scoot, teaching them to literally pick up their feet and move, all of these things are super important. And they actually are activities of daily living that is going to transfer, you know, transfer into what they're doing or what they're going to need for life. And so you know, again, I can talk all about, you know, basketball and careers and vertical jumps and what we've done, but at the end of the day does not matter the age of the individual, to our what we're trying to think stress on both of our points is you want to have really good alignment. You don't want the knees to cave in, you don't want the feet to go out and you want to maintain proper alignment and you're in your spine in relation to your shin when you go down into any kind of squat or any kind of like athletic position in order to best recruit the muscles to get you to explosively, move faster, whatever that pastor is for you. But I think in the very beginning, understanding that if you're going to teach someone how to properly land, you need to find exercises that will allow you to teach someone to land. So for example, a squat jump, if you go down into a squat position, you have them, you know, try to fully come out of hip flexion, which means their their spine will be straight up in the air when they jump, and then they land and absorb that landing. And even if their feet go out or you notice their knees caving in, then fix it, have them hold at the bottom and then repeat. And if their feet go out, knees, command, fix it, and then repeat and repeat. So you're retraining the brain how to start to move correctly by doing it over and over and over correctly. So your body can learn to reprogram the brain, you know, so think about like a computer system, you're reprogramming your system in order to start to execute things the right way, and then speed it up and then move faster.
 
Ken Miller:
Right. And when we talk about power, especially as you were, as you're talking and talking about the active aging population, I have this group again, I've brought them up before. You know, between Greg, Jim and cam, these guys on average 75 years old, right? But they still they, they water ski, they ski, they, they golf, they walk, and they still do all the things. And when I first started working with them, I don't know it's closer to eight years ago now. And now we're virtual, mean plyometrics. And power was just never a part of it. Right, it was never a part of it. So that's, that's the graduation of working from stability and controlling themselves first. I remember the first thing you brought up speed ladder, the first time I brought up the brought out the ladder. And they're conditioned to, you know, from what they've just seen, you know, how athletes chained to go through there as fast as you can. And that's what you want when it comes to these skills in these drills. But when I had them kind of do a little zigzag, they kind of put their two feet in to the ladder, and then when their foot comes out, to balance on hold, and that was one of the hardest things for them to do is just cut to kind of get that momentum, couple steps of momentum into one direction and then stick the landing right as gymnasts do. And that was the hard part. And part of it's not just keeping up right and not falling. That's the safety is always first and foremost. But it's watching how the hips are reacting and do their hips drop, do they lean forward, like in you know, we keep talking about the knees when it comes to landing mechanics. And that was just one way to kind of add a little lateral movement and translating from one direction to the next and stopping. And then the other direction and stopping and holding, and just controlling that deceleration. Because now I mean, hopefully again, you mentioned with your professional athletes having being durable during the season, even having a longer career now we're just talking about life, can you play longer, right? Can you play golf, until it's not time to play golf anymore, right, and can you still have a game that you can still brag about when it comes to speed and performance into the into the later So just to give a little different context to what that means to to learn how to slow down stop, because now you fire the glutes better. Your your basically your software, which is your nervous system, as you brought up is is matching the hardware, which is the body that you have to run the program. Right. So you have both software from the nervous cognitive standpoint as you as you mentioned, and now you have a stronger, stronger system of muscles connected, you know, the soft tissues are there, the integrity is there at the joints so that the body can do what the mind tells it to do when it wants to do it.

Wendy Batts:
And I think it's also important, I know, we've talked a lot about youth, but guys, I mean, when they're younger we did I know we've we've talked about this, like don't let parents, you know and push stuff. But the more I mean, and I do this with my son, you know, like for example, I want him to have good, you know, good speed and good rotational movement throughout his hips and everything. You know, I want him to be a kid I want him to obviously move safely. But you start to learn power, like you said automatically at a young age. And so it's hard when you get older to try to increase your power if you've never really did it when you were young. And so I know working with some you know pro golfers they want to crease your club head speed, well, of course they do, who doesn't. However, there are certain things that you can do on a physical standpoint of getting your core right, like you said, lining your joints up. And then just hitting it as hard as you possibly can to learn you're teaching your body how to produce power. However, if you have, you know, a kid at home and you know it's safe for them, have them swing as hard as they can have them move as fast as they can now because those activities that they're learning at a young age will continue to stay with them. As long as you continue to nurture those movement patterns throughout your you know, you're aging period and you're in your workouts. So start easy teach power move, right. And, you know, and that's more for like rotational things or movement patterns and swinging you know, like a, you know, a tennis racquet, a golf club, whatever that is, but we're talking a lot about the foot, you know, the foot complex and the fancy drills and everything. That's, you know, that's something that again, you start moving in an like an environment that's not ideal. The amount of injuries that could happen throughout your entire body is I mean, it's unreal. And so when we you know, we're not talking about this and taking it lightly land correctly support your joints, because long term if you don't, you're gonna have too much wear and tear on things that you could have easily prevented just taking two steps back and learning how to land properly and looking at your at your movement patterns.
 
Ken Miller:
Right? And you know, I love it when you give me you open the door for me to talk about my kids because I could talk about my you know, just because you know, I brought it up before we're like, Well, my daughter who's who's playing water polo now? Yeah, she's got to throw the ball and I see her toss a ball. I'm like, Oh, come on, you gotta go a little bit faster than that. So that parent can say that in my head, right? So now I'm thinking, Okay, well, what did we do to strengthen up, you know, we, you know, have good core strength, good shoulder stability first. Because, again, I want her to play Water Polo, as long as she's interested. And she's very interested. So first things first, I want her to have fun, enjoy it, learn the sport. And then then we can work on Okay, well, okay, throw that ball as hard as you can, as fast as you can. Because that way, we're teaching the nervous system to be powerful. And then for my son who's playing baseball, or he has a strong interest in baseball, you know, strong and interest you can have at eight years old. But you know, here he is, he's trying to finesse the ball into my glove, and like, just throw hard man, just, you know, take that big jump, big push stride long, and then throw that as hard as you can at me, you know, just because I am trying to get him to move. And baseball is just a reason to move fast at this point, right as waterpolo is for my daughter to move fast for her and anything to get them to move differently than they would on a, on a on a regular basis. And it is those are exploring opportunities to move quickly, that looks like fun, that we can have fun together, as you know, as parents and children should. And then you know, and then you can look at the the mechanics of it, you know, as things progressed, because, you know, as they're younger, they don't have the muscle imbalances, they don't have the compensation, that they might need to fine tune a couple things, you know, it's like, hey, instead of throwing, you know, towards me, on my right, or towards my left, you know, maybe that will adjust a couple of things, but I'm not going to tell them that just move fast, move powerfully. And let's, let's have fun while we do and I think you know, whether your kid or a professional player who gets paid to move quickly, I think you mean having fun at this during this whole process, because it can be tedious. It can be cumbersome, you know, to tell somebody, hey, I love how you're doing it. But I don't love how you're doing it. Right. And to move quickly it is it is a matter of safety. So trying to ride that line of Okay, well, what's safe? And what's fun, and how can we make this entertaining to where you actually have a buy in to do it on your own. And that's, that's, and that's another point of working out is like how much we work together that's going to be controlled, but how much you do on your own is going to be the next thing that keeps you safe and powerful.
 
Wendy Batts:
Yes. And just so you know, I tell Braden, like when we're doing golf, or he's actually
at the plate getting ready to swing for his t ball. I'm like, just whack it as hard as you can. And then he'll look at me, he's like, Mom, you know it. Like I'm sitting there with all these parents. He's like, Mom, I watch this. I'm gonna whack it as hard as I can. I'm like Adeboye. And people are looking at me like what is wrong with this crazy lady, you know, because it's fun. And that's what that's what he does. So those of you guys that are just joining us, I'm Wendy Batts, here with Ken Miller on random fit. And we are talking about, I've got the power. So we're talking really just about power training, power production. And when you're actually starting to work with your kids work with yourself or implement power into your programming, how important it is because it really does carry over to everyday life. And you know, we've talked about, you know, being able to, like, do something like a squat jump, hold that for three to five seconds, repeat it until you get good mechanics. But then once you do that, and you know that you own those mechanics, the next kind of systematic progression or the next progression is just try to start doing those in a repetitive motion. Can you maintain proper alignment? Can you do 12 jumps or eight jumps, whatever it may be? Can you do those jumps side to side, keeping your feet you know, spaced, you know the right way and having your knees track over the body the way that it's intended to? And then progress to something more powerful, how fast can you explode up, you know, or side to side or start moving at a productive as fast as you can motion and everything that you're doing just to see if you've seen an increase. However, keep in mind, it takes the body four to six weeks to adapt to whatever type of training so you want to do this in a fashion where you know, it's not something that you're just doing every time you come into the gym, you're going to try one, go to another go to another, you know, stick with the landing in different ways. Rotate, move side to side, hold each landing for that duration, then try to speed it up and then try to go as powerful as possible. And if you do that, you're probably going to be well more, you know, way more successful. And your body is going to think we're at long term because as we know, jumping as hard running as hard jumping as hard doing anything that has any kind of impact on the spine. You've got to embrace those landings, you know, the best that you can and you know, I think that's
super, super important. And I mean, I do you have an example. There's an example that I use with my clients. But do you have an example of the importance of landing?

Ken Miller:
You know, Wendy nothing that would keep our listeners tuned in any longer than compared to if you explain why you what you have in Miami, I mean, my steps is pretty cut dry. But give me give me an example of what you I'm gonna throw it right back at you, Wendy. Yeah, well, how do you explain that to your clients? Well, it's actually about throwing, you know, and I try to use that as an example. So I'll tell people, because most of my clients are visual, I don't go into the techie talk, like I don't do any of that's probably why they stick around. And so I let them know, like, hey, the importance of our landing technique is going to be this, if I've got a raw egg in my hand, and I'm gonna throw it to you, I want you to catch it. And you know, you've got two options, you can cradle the catch, or you can catch it flat, and then see what happens. And I'm like, so if you had to choose between a and b, which would you choose, of course, everyone chooses the cradle, they choose a, because you're trying to absorb that. So you don't wear the egg, right? Nobody wants to have stinky, nasty egg all over them. And so that visually lets them see that impact that can have without proper landing and absorption of it, you know, plus, think about if you land correctly, you're going to be able to explode upward, especially if we're doing something like a squat jump. So we're reducing the amount of time spent on the ground. And that that's known as the amortization phase. And so if you can decrease the amount of time on the ground by being able to explode upward, you know, as repetitively and as powerfully as possible, that is a win all around, but you've got to work your way up to it. And so I use the egg as the example because they understand the importance of the reactive part of the foot embracing the landing, readjusting and then exploding and repeating and, you know, and holding So, so that's, that's, that's my I know,

Wendy Batts:
That. that's a lot more exciting than what I would have said, you know, well, I am exciting factor of the world, you know, it's a good. I mean, that's a great visual, because I know that, you know, you know, when you're younger, you got a picnic, and you do that, that egg toss. Yeah. And, you know, what do you do you accepted up here, and then you just kind of let the body absorb that egg as you come down. Otherwise, yeah, it is hard splat and you smell like egg for the rest of the day. Because Good luck getting that off of you at a picnic site.

Ken Miller:
But, you know, when you talked about, you know, now that as you have good control your body and we can start increasing speed and direction. One of the things that I like to point out with with those points on the table is the fact that you can't predict, right, the, the, the direction of resistance, that's going to hurt you, right? It could be from the right, it could be from the left, it can be a little off center, it could be you know, from the top down, and that could be the, the straw that broke the camel's back when it comes to how somebody got hurt, right? Because how many times have you heard of some get hurt. And it was a it was a fluke, right? Or they they just, they were stopping turning, they dropped their keys, and they were picking it up. And then they heard a pop, you know, I've heard of clients, a few clients say something along those lines. So having diversification in how you move a variety of directions and speeds and, and distances and highlights of what you jump on to or even hop off of, is going to be important because it gives your muscles or your nervous system an opportunity to encounter different things so that if if you do have something that's unexpected, it's not the first time your nervous system has seen that. Right? And then it's in it says, Oh, we've seen this before. Yeah, okay, we'll just slow down this direction control here. And then he's going to do this and that and all is right in the world. So having a variety of speeds and tempos, directions, heights, distances and all that stuff just gives the body the the nervous system, a different a different look at how to control itself and to absorb force as much as we're talking about producing force. And I think that's where ultimately, safety comes in is how do you accept things like that egg on an egg toss, right, as well as throwing things away from you and in in producing force and the velocity? Yes.

Wendy Batts:
I can't say anything other than yes or Exactly. But I mean, I think the key points for me if I were to give my takeaways is you know, age shouldn't matter. You should train for power. Yeah, as long as as appropriate and they can move you know, they move well then, you know, increase you know, have your have your people lift heavy things, and something that may be heavy to me is super light to Ken something that is super light, you know, are super.
 
Ken Miller:
Yeah, it can be super light for me depending on what it is. And so you know, but you have to have, you know, good, a good foundation. So you want to be stable, you want to build up to lifting heavy things. As soon as you're done lifting heavy things, do things that are explosive that mimic those same patterns. And you're going to really increase long term power when you're thinking about a workout. However, you have to be very strategic and make sure that there was a progression and that you just didn't do it for the sake of doing that type of workout that day, because you felt like it, you want to make sure that your body can control what you're going to do. And then it can accept that so you don't increase your chances of injury. That's that when you're thinking of a workout. But then also what we've been talking about is, you know, power production, like meaning acceleration, deceleration moving in different planes at faster speeds. And so you know, different types of drills, like you said, and I think it's important, train different ways, train different directions, expose yourself as much as you can, while you're focusing on that. So therefore it will carry over when you know, all of a sudden you're at a you're at, you're in the middle of the street, and all of a sudden the light has turned yellow, you need to be able to get across and step up very quickly on to the curb, so you don't get hit by a car.
 
Wendy Batts:
So this stuff is important because this stuff happens. And I think you know, those are my key takeaways is just be very strategic, be smart, but train fast. So therefore, you don't hurt yourself. Right? And I think the only thing I want to just kind of summarize everything that you've said is you got to train at the speed of life. You never know what's going to come at you when it's gonna come at you. A lot of times we're we're blindsided with things not just physically emotionally but emotionally and spiritually however you want to get a lot of things happen right. But from a from a from a physical standpoint, we want to know that a we can handle anything that comes at us especially when it requires me getting out of the way really really fast.
 
Ken Miller:
So great, great episode I love talking about you know, or hearing what you have to say about training and how you handle things and and I'm sure that our all our viewers and listeners actually benefiting from this as much as I am as far as spending time with you, Wendy. So thank you so much for spending another episode with me here on the "Random Fit" on you got the power. So if you love what we talked about today and want to hear more from us, like, follow, Subscribe, comment, and until next time, here on the "Random Fit" show. Take care and be well.
 
 
 

 

The Author

National Academy of Sports Medicine

National Academy of Sports Medicine

Since 1987 the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) has been the global leader in delivering evidence-based certifications and advanced specializations to health and fitness professionals. Our products and services are scientifically and clinically proven. They are revered and utilized by leading brands and programs around the world and have launched thousands of successful careers.