Certified Personal TrainerFitness Week

Start Your Career in Personal Training with NASM

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 By Stacey Penney, MS, NASM-CPT, CES, PES, FNS

Employment for personal trainers is expected to continue growing at a faster than average rate compared to other industriesThe US Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics has predicted an employment increase of 24% by 2020. The National Academy of Sports Medicine Certified Personal Trainer (NASM-CPT) certification is recognized throughout the fitness industry—the certification that offers greater starting salaries on average, according to SimplyHired.com. Personal trainers have great earning potential with the majority of full-time personal trainers making between $30,000 and $49,000 per year, and NASM certified personal trainers typically make $42,000 – their first year! As trainers develop their specialties, they can see their income grow by 20%. Many personal trainers even launch their own successful training businesses.

The need for qualified personal trainers continues to grow as the industry strives to keep pace with projected consumer demand. Businesses and insurance providers are finally recognizing the benefits of fitness programs for their employees and members, offering incentives to join gyms or other fitness facilities, leading to an increased demand for qualified personal trainers. According to the International Health, Racquet & Sportsclub Association (IHRSA), over 6.3 million Americans used personal training services in 2010, paying an average of $48.89 per session. In the US there are more than 29,000 health clubs serving over 51 million members.

NASM is recognized by major health clubs across the county. Not only do NASM CPTs work one-on-one with clients at health clubs, they can also be found working at medical centers, chiropractic offices, vacation resorts, corporate fitness facilities, recreation centers, weight loss programs, public and community health organizations, senior living communities, post-rehab and physical therapy clinics, private homes, along with sports teams ranging from amateur to professional.

Personal trainers can help turn-around our unfavorable health trends. IHRSA cited one of the reasons why health club members quit their membership, or don’t even join, is that there was no one there to guide them. Add other responses such as not knowing what to do, fear of hurting themselves, and not attaining their goals, and you can see how important a role personal trainers play in helping America get fit.  On the flip side, the reason why members joined and stayed was to get healthy, lose weight, have fun, reach their goals, and having access to fitness professionals. Again, personal trainers can have a far reaching impact with the services they offer in the settings they work.

A career in personal training offers the freedom other careers don’t. Enjoy an active lifestyle while you help others achieve their fitness and health goals. Avoid the desk job and change the lives of others by taking the first steps toward a personally and financially rewarding career.

 

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The Author

National Academy of Sports Medicine

National Academy of Sports Medicine

Since 1987 the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) has been the global leader in delivering evidence-based certifications and advanced specializations to health and fitness professionals. Our products and services are scientifically and clinically proven. They are revered and utilized by leading brands and programs around the world and have launched thousands of successful careers.

2 Comments

  1. Michael Quariadi
    November 11, 2013 at 8:34 pm — Reply

    Is it common for new personal trainers to relocate for part-time jobs? It seems to me that most of the job openings for personal trainers are part-time jobs. About 80%. Employers of personal trainer jobs are not going to pay relocation expenses for a new personal trainer moving in from out of town. That means that for all practical purposes, it may be necessary to relocate just to start a part-time job, in order to get your foot in the door. Relocation is a huge expense, which is hard to justify with the pay from a part-time job, which will probably not even over basic living expenses by itself.

  2. September 28, 2018 at 10:09 am — Reply

    I was wondering which certification to get. I asked three gyms and they gave me three different answers. I was searching online for a solid answer and I decided on NASM based on this site: It’s http://www.TheSixFigureTrainer.com

    I narrowed it down to ACE, NASM, and ACSM … and I decided on NASM once I did a little research.

    There are some great articles here about building your personal training business, and along with helping me choose my certification, I’m also deciding on the right gym for my business.

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